Nests and Eggs of Birds of The United States Illustrated Thomas G. Gentry

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Nests and Eggs of Birds of The United States Illustrated  by  Thomas G. Gentry

Nests and Eggs of Birds of The United States Illustrated by Thomas G. Gentry
| Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 315 pages | ISBN: | 6.25 Mb

Plate I.—AMPELIS CEDRORUM, Sclater.—Cedar-Bird.The Cedar-Bird, though mainly a denizen of the wooded regions of North America, and occasionally of cultivated fields and orchards, has been known to nest from Florida to the Red River country. But,MorePlate I.—AMPELIS CEDRORUM, Sclater.—Cedar-Bird.The Cedar-Bird, though mainly a denizen of the wooded regions of North America, and occasionally of cultivated fields and orchards, has been known to nest from Florida to the Red River country.

But, wherever found during the non-breeding period, it is the same gregarious, nomadic species.After the beginning of October, the search for food so completely engrosses the attention, that it is not until the latter part of May, or the beginning of June, that the flocks break up into pairs.Nidification now becomes the all-absorbing passion, and the birds after mating, which business is generally conducted in a quiet and unostentatious manner, repair to the woods or hedges in quest of a suitable shrub or tree in which to establish a home.

This matter requires considerable labor and care- and, ordinarily, no little time is devoted thereto.The place usually selected, is a retired and unfrequented thicket or nook- or occasionally, an orchard in close proximity to an occupied dwelling. When the former, the cedar, with its tall, nearly vertical branches and dark green foliage, is, of all our forest-trees, pre-eminently fitted to receive, support, and conceal the nest- when the latter, the apple is accorded the preference.Having chosen the locality, the birds waste no time in idleness, but apply themselves to the task of building, with the most commendable zeal and perseverance.

Each bird has its allotted part of the work to perform: the duty of the male being to collect the materials- that of the female, to shape and fix them in their proper places. Occasionally the latter, when not thus occupied, accompanies her partner in his frequent journeys, and assists in collecting and bringing in his load. The time employed in the labor of construction, making due allowances for recreation and rest, is between five and six days.In form, the typical structure is nearly hemispherical, and presents a rather neat and elegant appearance.

It is compactly made, and, in the generality of instances, exhibits anything but bulkiness. In position, it rests upon the horizontal limb of a tree, or is wedged in among several upward-growing branchlets, at elevations varying from three to twenty feet.During the period of nidification, almost any substance, having the requisite flexibility and strength, is in demand- consequently, the materials of composition are as varied as they are numerous, and depend in a great measure upon the environment.

In thickets, small twigs, stems of grasses, dried leaves, lichens, and the tendrils of the vine, make up the bulk of the structure- but in places situated in close proximity to houses, wrapping-twine, strips of rags, and such other substances as are ready prepared and accessible, are utilized. The lining is generally fine roots of grasses, bits of string, flower-stalks, lichens and tendrils.

The cavity seldom exceeds three inches in width, and scarcely two and a half in depth- while the external diameter varies from four and a half inches to five- and the height, from two and a half to three.



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